Resident Research »  Leadership »  Research Committee Members »  Sandy Feng, M.D., Ph.D.
Sandy Feng, M.D., Ph.D.

Sandy Feng, M.D., Ph.D.

Professor of Surgery
Division of Transplant Surgery
Director, Abdominal Transplant Fellowship Program

Contact Information

(415) 353-8725 Academic
sandy.feng@ucsf.edu 
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  • Harvard College, B.A., Chemistry, 1979-82
  • Cambridge University, England, Ph.D., Molecular Biology, 1982-85
  • Stanford University School of Medicine, M.D., 1985-90
  • Brigham and Women's Hospital, Intern, Surgery, 1990-91
  • Brigham and Women's Hospital, Resident, Surgery, 1991-94
  • Brigham and Women's Hospital, Chief Resident, Surgery, 1994-95
  • University of California, San Francisco, Fellow, Transplant Surgery, 1996-98
  • Stanford University School of Medicine, Postdoctoral Fellow, Molecular Biology, 1986-88
  • The Whitehead Institute, MIT, Postdoctoral Fellow, Molecular Biology, 1995-96
  • American Board of Surgery, 1996
  • Clinical Fellowship, Division of Transplantation
  • The Liver Center at UCSF
  • Director, Expanded Criteria Donor Kidney Transplant Program, University of California, San Francisco
  • UCSF Hellen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center
  • Expanded Criteria Donor Kidney Transplantation
  • Immunosuppression for Liver Transplantation
  • Kidney Transplantation
  • Liver Transplantation
  • MELD Allocation and Living Donor Liver Transplantation
  • Pancreas Transplantation
  • Defining the Optimal Immunosuppression for Specific Transplant Settings
  • Expanded Criteria Donors
  • Immunosuppression Withdrawal and Identification of a Profile Predictive of Tolerance
  • Immunosuppression Withdrawal for Stable Pediatric Living Donor Liver Transplant Recipients
  • Improving Long-term Outcomes for Liver Transplant Recipients
  • Novel Immunosuppression Strategies for Liver Transplantation
  • Strategies to Decrease Ischemia Reperfusion Injury to Improve Early Graft Function after Kidney Transplantation

As Professor of Surgery and Director of the Abdominal Transplant Fellowship Program at UCSF, Dr. Sandy Feng performs liver, kidney and pancreas transplants and teaches surgical fellows, residents, and medical students. She received a doctorate in molecular biology from Cambridge University with her Marshall Scholarship and earned her medical degree at Stanford University School of Medicine. She then completed general surgery residency at the Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and a transplant fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco.

Dr. Feng has numerous leadership roles, including Councilor for the American Society of Transplant Surgeons, Deputy Editor for the American Journal of Transplantation, former Co-Chair of the Executive Planning Committee for the American Transplant Congress, and current Chair of the Kidney Pancreas Advisory Committee of the American Society of Transplantation. She has been an invited organizer or participant in several national consensus conferences addressing issues critical to the transplantation community.

Dr. Feng's research interest focuses on transplant immunology, with a particular focus on determinants of organ tolerance. She is also investigating novel immunosuppressive regimens and pursuing immunosuppression withdrawal in selected liver transplant recipients. By studying the immune profiles of transplant patients who are successfully weaned from immunosuppressants, she and her group hope to predict prospectively which patients may be good candidates for immunosuppression withdrawal.

  1. Feng S, Goodrich NP, Bragg-Gresham JL, Dykstra DM, Punch JD, DebRoy MA, Greenstein SM, and Merion RM. Characteristics Associated with Liver Graft Failure: The Concept of a Donor Risk Index. American Journal of Transplantation 2006; 6(4): 783-790.
  2. Washburn K, Meo N, Halff G, Roberts J, and Feng S. Factors Influencing Liver Transplant Length of Stay at Two Large Volume Transplant Centers. Liver Transplantation 2009; 15(9): 1570-1578.
  3. Parekh J, Bostrom AB, and Feng S. Diabetes Mellitus: A Risk Factor for Delayed Graft Function after Deceased Donor Kidney Transplantation. American Journal of Transplantation 2010; 10(1): 298-303.
  4. Seyfert-Margolis V and Feng S. Tolerance: Is it Achievable in Pediatric Solid Organ Transplantation? Pediatric Clinics of North America 2010; 57(2): 523-528.
  5. Feng S. Donor Intervention and Organ Preservation: Where is the Science? What are the Obstacles? American Journal of Transplantation 2010; 10(5): 1155-1162.
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